shizzzon
I know many like to sand\resin inside an enclosure but to be near to completely perfect, this method is done freehand and can have human error.
Therefore, any slight dips in the resin from sanding too much or applying too much resin in one area doesn't permit total smoothness.

I was leaning more on the lines of sheeting.

From what i gather, you want a smooth surface but that's not what makes it work.
Correct me if i'm wrong but if your enclosure is solid\rigid braced on the outside, the material or method used to create a smooth surface inside the box must be built to a degree like that too.

You don't want the internal lining of a box to be resonating, flexing, bowing or moving which will make the enclosure itself worthless to have such extensive bracing inside.

I was looking at using Acrylic sheeting for inside of an enclosure but after thinking about it... it may make it smooth and can be laid with contact cement but if i went an extra step and tried Polycarbonate sheeting.

It claims to be 250x stronger than glass(Lexan\Tuffak), etc and is basically glass so it's pretty damn smooth as it is.

this can help make the internal lining more rigid while smoothing it out.

Is this too extreme or shall i just step down to acrylic sheeting?

Also, due to the high strength of Polycarbonate, to save on weight, is 1\8" thick enough to achieve internal rigidness if the enclosure itself is 4.25" thick?
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dB Don
The reason people resin is the reflective characteristics but also the minimal absorption that it adds to the wood. Your material that you glue on the inside will absorb more than the bare wood. Good for daily if it has to look nice but for spl you might lose a few tenths.

You should have no bracing inside the enclosure if its built solid but nothing will beat a good sanded/painted coat of resin.
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shizzzon
i figured glass was more reflective than pretty much anything.

The bracing it can add isn't cross-bracing. It just gets massloaded to the inside walls of the enclosure.

The reason i thought of it is because i know people have had excellent results with very thick solid glass enclosures.

So if an enclosure is built solid out of wood with a single sheet of Lexan inside the design on each wall for smooth and reflectiveness, i don't see how it could hurt.
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davor-ri
smooth enough?

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shizzzon
dont mean to critize but there are seams everywhere in that enclosure and a 3\4" crossbrace inside which will add turbulence.

I've been talkin to others and they all prefer me to just stick with sanding and resining so i'll stick with it.

I plan on steel caging the design and build within with oak and 2x4s. I'll run all the speaker wire(dual 8awg per polarity terminal using custom adapters) inside of the walls themselves so the wire won't cause turbulence then just resin over everything over and over and over and sand between intervals til my score stops going up.
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dB Don
I am not knocking glass enclosures because we all know the thick glass works. but when to put a thin layer of glass you have to attach it somehow and thats where the problem is in the material to glue it. And the cost over just sanded resin for the tenth or two?
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