Jerhemy1331
I spent some time this weekend installing my ground wires, I am pretty sure I found a good stop that connects directly to the frame, I sanded the paint away down to bare metal and tightened the bolt up as tight as I could without a breaker bar.

I am also interested in finding out exactly how to test the resistance of the ground connections to make sure they will work. I don't want problems down the road because my ground connection is bad. I thought I had read in a thread on here that using a DMM you can test the ground location, just not 100% sure what else needs to be done to do this.

Thanks for any help!

Here are some pics of the ground wires and the spot I chose...






I had to "modify" the ring terminals to allow the bolt through


A close up before I really tightened it down at all.
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Jerhemy1331


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D-Bass
you can put a DMM from the front battery(-) to the grounding point, this would tell you if you have any major resistance....but that's only barely helpful. You may read less than 0.01ohm of restistance and think you're great, but that's with less than 1amp of current. Now when you add a few thousand watts and you're trying to pull 500A of current, the resistance would be WAY WAY higher trying to pass that much
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Jerhemy1331
i gotcha, that makes sense for sure. so there isn't really an easy way to make sure it's good to go for full power?

if it is not a satisfactory grounding what kind of issues would/could I run in to once I get everything hooked up?

Thanks for the info
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bland1
You would have a good starting voltage, then it would just keep dropping till everything turns off. After a restart is would do it over again. Voltage should stay mostly steady when playing music at moderate levels.
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Jerhemy1331
having your equipment shut down because of low voltage can potentially be bad can't it?

I may just shoot a couple of self tapping screws through the edges of the ring terminals to ensure a good connection.
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D-Bass
why not just add an extra ground wire from your current chassis ground, and run that extra wire up to the alternator mounting ears? that way you are using chassis to carry ground, and also a large wire to also carry the load? I always chassis ground and run some wire to the front.
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Jerhemy1331
that seems like a logical solution. not sure what the alt mounting ears are, would you be able to point them out on a picture or something? I was almost going to run seperate + and - runs front to rear, but I figured I would save money by only using a couple of feet to ground instead of 15 feet each run. wish I woulda just done full runs from the beginning haha. Thanks for the info!
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D-Bass
the mounting ears/tab are the parts that stick out on the alternator where the bolts run through to mount it to the engine block. Some upgraded alternators have a grounding lug on the back, but MOST do not.
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Jerhemy1331


yea I don't see a ground bolt or anything on the back. So just run a ground cable to one of the securing bolts? That makes sense though for sure to help the chasis ground handle to current.
thanks d-bass
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