2doorcavy
i am working with the trunk of a 2005 chevy cavalier. all my past set ups have been subs up.. port back.. all sounded awesome im just trying somethin different.

i really dont know much about bandpasses.. but have a couple of close friends starting to get me in the right direction.. just hoping to get some more input..

what i want to do is use either 2 15 in Fi ssd's or 2-4 Re Se 10s

with a box that will slide into my trunk i have about 10 cubes to work with .. i want to do a 6th order.. but i dont know if that will be enough room for the 2 15's (which i would prefer to do cuz the FS is lower then on the tens) and how exactly i would go about calculating it..

anytype of input would be greatly appreciated!
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splfrek
I dont think you will have the room for a bandpass plus they sound like crap to me but work wonders on the meter
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2doorcavy
they def do sound different.. i'll give you that. but i have def heard a few that i like how they sounded.

and like i said i just wanted try somethin different.. any ideas on something that may work that i could try out?
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D-Bass
no room for 2x15 bandpass.
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ShadowStar
Bandpass have very bad reputations, but really they aren't all that complicated.

For street beater cars, it is easy to put in a set of woofers into a cheap prefab 4th or 6th order that will match poorly to the car (and woofers,) giving you a distinctly one note (and otherwise sloppy) result.

Well designed bandpass boxes control woofer excursion through efficiency, roll off properly to match with the car (4th order is better at this generally,) and have great sound quality.

The downside:

Bandpass (4th or 6th) have the distinction of having all of the air come out of the port.

6th order are very difficult to design properly and to execute, period. In this age of readily available EQ and electronic filters on almost every amplifier, 6th order is fading fast.

4th order BP's match well with car transfer functions SQ-wise, but they favor subs which tend to work well in small sealed boxes. The subwoofers available today that work well in small sealed boxes are usually underhung designs with huge motors and huge xmax. This complicates the construction and can lead to huge group delay numbers in the 50-70 region or an enormous amount of port noise. If you're looking at big SPL oriented subs, and lots of them, bandpass will get more and more undesireable from many aspects. A lot of this will be mitigated by the fact that it will be in the trunk, port noise doesn't travel well, and this might be the saving grace.

If you DID want to try for it, I would follow manufacturers recomendations first. Simply call up the company that makes your subs and ask them what they suggest.

I can model up a couple of options once you settle on your woofer options, and whether you really want to take the trouble to get into constructing a big bandpass.

Bandpass are fun, and they can be rewarding in the long run, but they add complication and cost. Also, you put your woofers inside the box, not outside, so showing them off is harder, and often that's half the reason to do something different.


ShadowStar
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2doorcavy
i see.. well thanks for the help guys.. i wont be doing a bandpass after all.. taking in the tips from you guys and a couple other veteran competitors who are also familiar with bandpasses. i will hopefuly with in the next week or 2 tryin a 2 15's set up in my cav..

i'll see if i can get some pictures up! thanks again for the help
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