nickword 1 Show full post »
pimpin at my house
^ true dat i see 3/4" of coil above the top plate and none below.
Quote 0 0
winslow
How much engineering is involved and how much is just making and putting stuff together?
Quote 0 0
Nemanja
wait isnt that too much gap??
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by pimpin at my house:
i really like the 1st sub the neo i dont. the way the mags are held in is what im not feeling. there is 4 points for the top plate and bottom plate to hold so unless all tolerances of joining surfaces are .0002". i see there is glue used but still.

what about notching the top and bottom plate so they sit in...
I just found out a day or two ago that there was even a post about the subs on this board. The magnets are held in place by a bolt running through the middle of the magnet from the top plate to the back plate. We were considering to only use four bolts for the entire motor but it was not enough to hold it in place. So we use four bolts for the top plate and back plate and four just for the mags. The top of the bolts are flush mount not to cause any issues with the motor mounting to the baskets.
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by JohnnyKo12:
My ten looks similar, not as wide though. Sometimes it's hard to get in when it's that fat.

Makes for mounting issues
Gravity helps a lot when mounting them!!! LOL.... Taking the subs back out is more of a chore but, there are no more difficult then many other brands with large motors.... (i.e. DD 9500, RE MT, or anything else with a 9" motor) just these way a little more...
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by dB Don:
Good thing that neo is not glued together yet, because if it was it would have been a big fail on coil placement.
All of the voice coils are hung evenly the gap (i.e. equal amount hanger over as well as under the top plate - all the subs use over hung voice coils). I will take a picture soon with the proper coil in the sub. Good catch by the way, most people would not even look for it. I was taking pictures of all of the subs to get the website fired up and used the coil from one of the smaller subs to make it faster and easier. These things are not fun to move around over and over again to take pictures of.
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by winslow:
How much engineering is involved and how much is just making and putting stuff together?
I can't commit on this for everyone but most companies that I know or that I have worked with in the past do tons of engineering. One of the biggest issues you have with engineers is that they never want to finish a project that they are working on because they can always make it better. Sometimes you just have to stop or stop them and move on to make some money to go back and make it better. Any company that is 100% happy with their products and never change almost always go out of business..... I hope this somewhat answers your question.
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by Nemanja:
wait isnt that too much gap??
I'm not sure what you mean, the magnetic gap for the voice coil or the thickness of the top plate?

The voice coil gap is pretty tight on these motors. The inside gap is tighter then on the outside to ensure that if the coil does move in the gap that the inside will hit and the outside of the coil can't scrape the coating off the coil and cause it to short out. This does happen from time to time if the sub is pushed past mechanical limits or if something hits the cone while it is playing.

If you were referring to the size of the top plate, then it really is not that large. The top plate is only 35mm thick and the average large motor has a 25mm top plate thickness. We went larger to have more coil in the gap and slightly lower the x-max of the driver a little to improve performance. It also gives the neodymium more steel to saturate since we used such a large amount of N45. We did try several different designs and this gave us the optimum amount of power handling, performance, cost, and efficiency. Some things we did try were larger amounts of neodymium, higher grades, different top plate thickness, different amounts of steel in the back plate and some changes on the t-yoke and so on. I think that this sub will make a lot of people happy with its performance and the price tag on it. If you would like more information on all of our products, you can look at more pictures of all of the subs at our myspace page until or website is up.
Quote 0 0
winslow
No, not really. Some of these things just look like parts thrown together. How much engineering was done to make these speakers? I would think you could saturate the steel and gap with less magnet material. The rest is just there for looks.

Why voice coil venting on the back plate of the neo speaker when the voice coil is open?

Those baskets can't handle the excursion either. If they could, you couldn't use a spider that is large enough to really control the cone.
Quote 0 0
Sonic Soundlabs
Quote:
Originally posted by winslow:
No, not really. Some of these things just look like parts thrown together. How much engineering was done to make these speakers? I would think you could saturate the steel and gap with less magnet material. The rest is just there for looks.

Why voice coil venting on the back plate of the neo speaker when the voice coil is open?

Those baskets can't handle the excursion either. If they could, you couldn't use a spider that is large enough to really control the cone.
Well, let me start with a little back ground. I have worked in the audio industry on the engineering side for over 12 years. I left the company that I was working for in 2006 and started this project in 2007. The neodymium sub in the picture was completed October of last year, so a total of 16 months (plus my 12 years of previous experience) on this one subwoofer.

On your second question yes, I could completely saturate the steel and gap with less magnet material. The issue is this design allows for energy loss by the magnets that takes place over time from heat and vibration. The amount used is to maximize performance, cost, and longevity!

On your third question, the reason for the venting in the back plate on the ceramic magnet subs is to allow heat to escape and allow the pressure build up under the coil to escape the motor. The neodymium subwoofer does not have the same issue with heat BUT, it still had pressure building up under the coil because the bottom of the motor is "cupped" and this causes pressure to build up. It is not a ton of pressure but it is enough to slow the coil down and in some extreme cases, some small amount of coil rock at full excursion. Anytime a voice coil moves in any direction except for up and down, it causes distortion or heat and heat is the enemy.

Fourth question. The 12 spoke baskets don't allow for as much x-max that we could produce but x-max is not a major factor. All subs move at the same rate to produce the same notes (i.e. 50 hz is 50 cycles per second) if the sub is moving 10mm or 60mm to produce this frequency, it is still the same 50 cycles. The subwoofer with the larger excursion is going to have to work much harder to achieve this. It is more stressful on the soft parts and require more power to do so and it would be much harder to control the cone. I would like to tool my own baskets in the future to make some aspects better then what the 12 spoke can offer but at this point in time the cost is not justifiable to other expenses that are more important.
Quote 0 0
Contact Us | Legal Notices | Privacy