john-hone
i know i asked before but the post is gone. where is a good start for setting x over points? highs, mid range and midbass.
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D-Bass
what range are the tweets and mids rated for?
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Andy Jones
80 down subs
80-250 midbass
250-5khz midrange
5khz and up tweeters.

Then start playing around. But that's a good safe starting point.
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john-hone
thanks again andy. i printed this one. lol
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dB Don
John can you post specs of your speakers your using?
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john-hone
Dayton Audio DC25T-8 1" Titanium Dome Tweeter
Features a ferro fluid cooled aluminum voice coil and a rubber surround. The 1" Titanium dome and precision phase lens, provides very natural sounding high frequency reproduction. * Power handling: 50 watts RMS/75 watts max * Voice coil diameter: 1" * Impedance: 8 ohms * Frequency response: 3,000-20,000 Hz * Magnet weight: 5.5 oz. * Fs: 1,659 Hz * SPL: 93 dB 1W/1m * Dimensions: Overall Diameter: 3-7/8", Cutout Diameter: 2-7/8", Mounting Depth: 1", Magnet Diameter: 2-3/4", Magnet Height: 7/8".


Dayton Audio DC160-8 6-1/2" Classic Woofer
One of the main design goals at Dayton Loudspeaker is to create loudspeakers that can achieve high levels of performance at reasonable prices. Our import series of treated cone drivers are developing quite a reputation for having the best price/performance value available anywhere. Non-pressed treated paper cones, ASV voice coils, vented pole pieces, rubber surrounds, coated cloth dust caps, and excellent low frequency performance are just some of the features you'll find on these quality woofers.

Specifications:
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dB Don
you have the ms-8 with the silly steep slopes. You can probably get the sub set to 60 and down, midbass 60 and up to 300, midrange 300 to 2500-3000 depending on placement/power and tweet takes it 2500-3k and up. Should give you a better soundstage over a 5k tweeter crossover point but check the compression levels on the tweets you might have to bump it up if they can't handle the output needed.
Really hard to guess without testing but your ears will tell you.
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D-Bass
I would start the tweeters no lower than 3500Hz, approximately double the Fs to avoid irregularities. If you're increasing the power(i know you want loud volume), then raise the crossover a bit. That should be a good point for the other speakers as well.

I like a steeper slope on the tweets, and a little less on the midrange and midbass
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Andy Jones
Guys, I was just suggesting a safe starting point. Those won't blow anything.

Funny enough, they are not that far off what I used in my car though.

40hz and down for my sub
40-250 for my midbass
250-5Khz for my midrange
5khz and up tweeter

Slopes all 24db/octave through an ODR system.

In my truck the last time I had it set up were:

40hz and down for my sub
40-180hz for midbass
140hz-6.3khz for midrange
6.3khz and up tweeter.

Again all 24db/octave through a 701 processor.


I'm not always a huge fan of dropping the crossover point on a tweeter. That will often lead to a blown tweeter when the volume knob gets twisted hard, and asking a small tweeter to play down into the midrange frequencies generally has some harsh results. I've heard it work. I've seen a tweeter crossed over below 1khz and it sounded good. But in general that's asking a bit much.

I put a huge emphasis on getting the midrange driver right. You get some sweet midrange going, and it will make everything else sound pretty darn good (or at least mask a good number of deficiencies in the system).
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Dan Anderson
Not trying to open a can of worms.

I have noticed that many car audio sq competitors advocate a low sub xover point. Others who are not car audio competitors but claim to be audio learned attribute this to the inability to tune properly.

In your opinion/experience, why is this so?
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Andy Jones
Low crossover point generall because it helps anchor the substage up front.

Play 100hz out of a sub and I can 99.9% of the time point to exactly where your sub is.

There are times that isn't the case, but it is a lot of the time.

Also, transfer function kicks in, and SQ guys are not looking for booming midbass (subbass depending on your definition).

As I heard one guy say, which is easier to control-- your 8" midbass or your 15" subwoofer?
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D-Bass
i agree. keep the subs below 60Hz in an SQ setup. even lower if your midbass drivers can handle it.
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